Does Drinking Water Lower Blood Pressure?

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High blood pressure (hypertension) affects 1 in 3 adults in the United States.

When a person has high blood pressure, the blood flow through the arteries is higher than normal.

There are ways to prevent and treat high blood pressure. It starts with your lifestyle. Exercising regularly will keep your heart healthy and stress levels low. In addition, mindfulness activities such as meditation, yoga, and journaling can help reduce stress.

Maintaining a nutrient-rich diet will also help. Reduce your consumption of processed foods, sugar, alcohol, and fried foods. Also, it's best to avoid tobacco if you smoke.

Along with a healthy diet, drinking water and staying properly hydrated can also help maintain healthy blood pressure.

This article will discuss the connection between hydration and heart health and explain the recommended water intake.

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Dehydration and Blood Pressure

It's important to stay hydrated for your overall health. There is a link between dehydration and blood pressure. When the body is properly hydrated, the heart is able to pump effectively so blood can move easily throughout the body, although more studies need to be conducted on this matter.

When the body is dehydrated, the heart must use more force and pump harder to distribute blood throughout the body. It takes more effort for the blood to get to the tissues and organs. Dehydration results in a lower blood volume which causes the heart rate and blood pressure to increase.

Water and Heart Health

To improve cardiovascular health, it's important to drink an adequate amount of water to keep your body hydrated and functioning properly. For some, plain water is fine. If you need a boost for taste, you can infuse your water with mint, cucumber, lemon, lime, and berries, among other healthy options.

Vitamins and minerals such as calcium and magnesium are known to reduce blood pressure. One study performed in Bangladesh found that adding calcium and magnesium to your water can help in lowering blood pressure. By consuming these minerals through water, the body can absorb them more easily. Before adding any new vitamins or minerals to your hydration regime, consult your doctor. They can help you make the right decision.

Recommended Water Intake

How much water should you be drinking? It depends. Many factors, such as your location, health status, daily habits, and food and drink consumption come into play.

Water does the body good. It's encouraged to drink water throughout the day to stay properly hydrated. Along with helping to lower blood pressure, it can assist in lubricating the body, reducing the risk of conditions like kidney stones and urinary tract infections, and it can help improve brain function.

In general, it's recommended to drink eight 8-ounce cups of water a day. It's important to note that some foods, like fruits and vegetables, also contain water. More specific guidelines include:

  • For women: Approximately 11 cups (2.7 liters or about 91 ounces) daily fluid intake (this includes all beverages and foods that contain water).
  • For men: Approximately 15.5 cups (3.7 liters or about 125 ounces) total daily fluid intake (includes all beverages and foods that contain water).

Summary

Having high blood pressure means that the blood flow through your arteries is higher than normal. Treating and preventing high blood pressure starts with making lifestyle adjustments, such as getting regular exercise and eating a nutrient-rich diet.

Drinking water and staying properly hydrated can also help maintain healthy blood pressure. In general, it's recommended to drink eight 8-ounce cups of water a day. It's important to note that some foods, like fruits and vegetables, also contain water.

A Word From Verywell

There are ways to manage and/or prevent high blood pressure. Checking your numbers regularly and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will help.

It's also important to manage your stress levels by understanding your limits and setting boundaries. Activities such as meditation, yoga, and journaling can help. Speaking with a licensed mental health professional can also help. They can give you tools to help process your thoughts and techniques to manage stress.

If you're diagnosed with high blood pressure, know that you're not alone. It can be managed through lifestyle changes and planning. Work with your doctor to establish ways to reduce blood pressure and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What drinks should I avoid with high blood pressure?

    In general, it's best to avoid sugary drinks as they can contribute to weight gain. Some of the drinks to limit and or avoid with high blood pressure include:

    • Sports drinks: These have high sugar content and should be avoided if you have high blood pressure. These are only recommended if you're exercising for long periods since they're known to replace the electrolytes lost through sweating.
    • Energy drinks: Energy drinks are different from sports drinks in that they don't replace electrolytes. These drinks typically contain large amounts of caffeine and other additives and should be avoided if you have high blood pressure.
    • Caffeinated drinks: Beverages like soda and coffee do add to your daily water intake. Yet, caffeine can cause you to lose fluid since it acts as a diuretic. The sugars from soda and additives in coffee don’t allow the body to effectively absorb water.
    • Alcohol: These beverages are known to dehydrate the body because of the sugars they contain. Alcohol also acts as a diuretic. It's important to consume plenty of water if you choose to drink alcohol.


  • How much water should I drink a day?

    In general, it's recommended to drink eight 8-ounce cups of water a day. It's important to note that some foods, like fruits and vegetables, also contain water. More specific guidelines include:

    • For women: Approximately 11 cups (2.7 liters or about 91 ounces) daily fluid intake (this includes all beverages and foods that contain water).
    • For men: Approximately 15.5 cups (3.7 liters or about 125 ounces) total daily fluid intake (includes all beverages and foods that contain water).

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